Patrons

Patrons 2017-09-29T12:18:08+00:00

The ACE project has 6 official patrons who support our work and offer invaluable advice. They are:

Professor Paul Cartledge

Paul Cartledge is A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at Cambridge University and a Fellow of Clare College. He has published extensively on Greek history over several decades, including The Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece (Cambridge 1997, new edition 2002), Alexander the Great: The Hunt for a New Past (2004, revised edition 2005), and more recently Ancient Greek Political Thought in Practice (Cambridge, 2009).

Professor Paul Cartledge

Natalie Haynes

Natalie Haynes is a writer and broadcaster. She writes for the Guardian, and the Independent. Her first novel, The Amber Fury, has been published to great acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic, as was The Ancient Guide to Modern Life, her previous book. She has spoken on the modern relevance of the classical world on three continents, from Cambridge to Chicago to Auckland.

She is a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4: reviewing for Front Row and Saturday Review, appearing as a team captain on three seasons of Wordaholics, and banging on about Juvenal whenever she gets the chance. A second series of her show, Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics, will be broadcast on Radio 4 next year.

Her documentary on the Defining Beauty exhibition at the British Museum, Secret Knowledge: The Body Beautiful aired in 2015 on BBC4 in the UK and on BBC World News everywhere else. She was a judge for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction, the 2013 Man Booker Prize, and the 2014 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

A more detailed biography is also available.

Natalie Haynes

Professor Malcolm Schofield

Malcolm Schofield is Professor Emeritus of Ancient Philosophy at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of a number of definitive texts in his areas of expertise: Saving the City: Philosopher-Kings and Other Classical Paradigms, which provides a detailed analysis of the attempts of ancient writers and thinkers, from Homer to Cicero, to construct and recommend political ideals of statesmanship and ruling; and The Stoic Idea of the City, which offers the first systematic analysis of the Stoic School.

Professor Malcolm Schofield

Dr Emma Bridges

Emma studied Classical Civilisation in a school in the north-east of England before reading Classics as an undergraduate, and later an MSt, at the University of Oxford (Brasenose College). She then spent three years at the University of Durham where she completed a PhD on the ancient reception of the figure of Xerxes. Her research interests lie primarily in the field of ancient Greek literature (especially epic, drama and historiography) and in the reception of classical history and culture in the modern world. In particular she is interested in ancient and modern literary and artistic responses to armed conflict.

Emma has been a lecturer at the Open University since 2007, spreading her love of Classics to students of all ages, and from all backgrounds. In 2017, she takes up a new post as Public Engagement Fellow at the Institute of Classical Studies in London.

Dr Emma Bridges

Charlotte Higgins

Charlotte is the chief culture writer of the Guardian, where writes she editorials, articles for the Long Read section, and pieces for Weekend, Review, G2 and Comment. She is the author of four works of non-fiction, three of them about the classical world. Under Another Sky: Journeys in Roman Britain (Jonathan Cape), was shortlisted for the 2013 Samuel Johnson prize, among other awards, and in 2010 she won the Classical Association prize. She believes everyone, whatever their background or income, should have the chance to learn about (and through) the classical world. She is a patron of Classics for All and a former council member of the Society of Roman Studies.
Charlotte was born in the Potteries, studied Classics at Oxford, and was awarded an honorary doctorate from Staffordshire University (alma mater of Clarice Cliff and Susie Cooper). She lives in London.

Charlotte Higgins

Professor Greg Woolf

Professor Greg Woolf is the Director of the Institute of Classical Studies. He writes: “It is a privilege as well as a pleasure to be associated with Advocating Classics Education which will fight to give as many as possible the opportunities I first enjoyed in the 1970s. I learned Latin and Greek at Bexhill Sixth Form College, and then at Christ Church, Oxford. I learned to dig on the Sussex Downs as a schoolboy, and later wrote a doctorate in Cambridge. I have taught at Leicester, Cambridge, Oxford and St Andrews before taking up my current post as Director of the Institute of Classical Studies and Professor of Classics in London in January 2015. Classics is the most naturally interdisciplinary subject it is possible to study or teach. I still enjoy going back and forth between history, archaeology and classical literature in my writing which has touched on literacy, economics, imperialism, libraries, pottery and hillforts. My work takes me around the world, because academic classics is a truly international community.

Professor Greg Woolf